George Paul O'Shea obituary photo
 
In Memory of

George Paul O'Shea

October 20, 1931 - November 20, 2016

Obituary


George Paul O'Shea, born George Paul Wells, was born October 20th 1931 to Margery Gertrude Bundy and Paul Warn Wells. He was so small as a preemie that his first bed was a shoe box. The doctor had to wrap cotton between his fingers, toes, and under his arms, to prevent his skin from growing together. In order to keep him warm, his parents put him on the oven door that first night. No one thought he would live more than 2 days. George was such a fighter, he proved everyone wrong. Because of his...

George Paul O'Shea, born George Paul Wells, was born October 20th 1931 to Margery Gertrude Bundy and Paul Warn Wells. He was so small as a preemie that his first bed was a shoe box. The doctor had to wrap cotton between his fingers, toes, and under his arms, to prevent his skin from growing together. In order to keep him warm, his parents put him on the oven door that first night. No one thought he would live more than 2 days. George was such a fighter, he proved everyone wrong. Because of his rough start in life, he was sick much of his first 8 years.

On July 8th 1940, George was adopted by his maternal grandmother Pearle Mae Roche O'Shea and her husband Cornelius O'Shea.

George grew up in Davenport, Iowa on his grandparents' farm. He came from "the wrong side of the tracks", as he called it, and grew up a poor farm boy. On the farm, he learned the importance of hard work, responsibility, and love for the great outdoors. He would make money in the summers by topping onions; bailing hay, and helping neighbors bring in their crops.

At the age of nine, his first job was as a class-A pin setter at the bowling alley seven nights a week. He would go to school during the day, go home to do his chores on the farm, and then walk 7 miles to town to set pins until midnight. If George finished working, and was outside when his grandmother drove by, she would stop and pick him up. But there were many nights he finished work just in time to see the taillights top the hill, which meant he had to walk home.

By age 14, George bought and paid for his first car, and the sheriff helped George get a chauffeur's license. They had him chauffeur people around town and had him on-call to tow cars from accidents.

George quit school after ninth grade to work. After getting his license, and finishing school, George went to work at the industrial factory alongside his grandfather, father, and a couple of his uncles. It was during this period in his life he was hit in the right temple with a wrench, beginning of the loss of his right eye.

George and Marilyn June Walker grew up in the same farming community. One night George wanted his current girlfriend to catch night crawlers with him, but she declined. Marilyn, however, volunteered, and he was hooked from that moment on. George and Marilyn started dating when he was 16 and she was 13.

In 1953, after trying to enlist and being denied because of the loss of his right eye, George asked Marilyn June Walker to marry him, and she said yes. Marilyn graduated from high school in June, married George in August, and turned 19 in September of that same year.

After being married for only two years, George was drafted into the Army in 1955. As part of the Army, George was a specialist in charge of personal records. While in the service, George taught himself to fire left handed. He became an expert shot, even out-shooting some of his superiors. George served from 1955 to 1957 at Fort Belvoir, Alexandria, Virginia. When discharged from the Army in 1957, George and Marilyn moved back to Davenport, Iowa.

In 1959, they started a family with the birth of their son Timothy Michael. In 1960, George moved his family to Colorado after vacationing there and falling in love with the mountains and the dry climate. His second child Sandra Kay was born in 1961, followed by his third child Kesha Eilleen, born in 1964.

George got a job with the Electrical Company of Colorado starting at $1.60 an hour. He retired from the Electrical Company in 1993, after working for more than 33 years. George always took pride in his work and taught his kids to do the same.

George and Marilyn joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints together in September 1960. His family was sealed together for time and all eternity in the Manti, Utah Temple in July of 1977.

George loved to hunt and fish. It was a big part of his life, and he took his family every year. Family would come from Iowa and Illinois, making hunting a family reunion. In his later years, he loved to travel, often with his daughter Sandie. One of his favorite trips was when they went to Ireland and kissed the Blarney stone.

After the death of his wife in 1999, George sold the family home and moved to Evergreen, Colorado to live in the apartment above his son's four-stall garage. He lived there for 14 years. Three years ago, he gave up his driver's license, and moved to a retirement community in Arvada. Now closer to his daughter Sandie, she and her husband Hank could care for, and entertain him. For the last 18 months, Sandie lived with George to take care of him and be a companion. George passed away November 20, 2016, with many friends and family members coming to say goodbye, with Sandie by his side.

George lived to be 85 yrs. old. It's now time for a wonderful rest with friends and family which we are here today to commemorate.